Scientific Publications

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2021

Project Baby Bear: Rapid precision care incorporating rWGS in 5 California children’s hospitals demonstrates improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs of care

Dimmock D, Caylor S, Waldman B, Benson W, Ashburner C, Carmichael JL, Carroll J, Cham E, Chowdhury S, Cleary J, D’Harlingue A, Doshi A, Ellsworth K, Galarreta CI, Hobbs C, Houtchens K, Hunt J, Joe P, Joseph M, Kaplan RH, Kingsmore SF, Knight J, Kochhar A, Kronick RG, Limon J, Martin M, Rauen KA, Schwarz A, Shankar SP, Spicer R, Rojas MA, Vargas-Shiraishi O, Wigby K, Zadeh N, Farnaes L. 

Click this link for free access until July 24, 2021 Am J Hum Genet. 2021 May 29:S0002-9297(21)00192-0. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.05.008. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Genetic disorders are a leading contributor to mortality in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units (ICUs). Rapid whole-genome sequencing (rWGS)-based rapid precision medicine (RPM) is an intervention that has demonstrated improved clinical outcomes and reduced costs of care. However, the feasibility of broad clinical deployment has not been established. The objective of this study was to implement RPM based on rWGS and evaluate the clinical and economic impact of this implementation as a first line diagnostic test in the California Medicaid (Medi-Cal) program. Project Baby Bear was a payor funded, prospective, real-world quality improvement project in the regional ICUs of five tertiary care children’s hospitals. Participation was limited to acutely ill Medi-Cal beneficiaries who were admitted November 2018 to May 2020, were <1 year old and within one week of hospitalization, or had just developed an abnormal response to therapy. The whole cohort received RPM. There were two prespecified primary outcomes-changes in medical care reported by physicians and changes in the cost of care. The majority of infants were from underserved populations. Of 184 infants enrolled, 74 (40%) received a diagnosis by rWGS that explained their admission in a median time of 3 days. In 58 (32%) affected individuals, rWGS led to changes in medical care. Testing and precision medicine cost $1.7 million and led to $2.2-2.9 million cost savings. rWGS-based RPM had clinical utility and reduced net health care expenditures for infants in regional ICUs. rWGS should be considered early in ICU admission when the underlying etiology is unclear. PMID:34089648 | DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2021.05.008

June 7, 2021
RPM for NICU and PICUrWGS

2020

An RCT of Rapid Genomic Sequencing among Seriously Ill Infants Results in High Clinical Utility, Changes in Management, and Low Perceived Harm

Dimmock DP, Clark MM, Gaughran M, Cakici JA, Caylor SA, Clarke C, Feddock M, Chowdhury S, Salz L, Cheung C, Bird LM, Hobbs C, Wigby K, Farnaes L, Bloss CS, Kingsmore SF; RCIGM Investigators.

Am J Hum Genet. 2020 Nov 5;107(5):942-952. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.10.003. ABSTRACT The second Newborn Sequencing in Genomic Medicine and Public Health (NSIGHT2) study was a randomized, controlled trial of rapid whole-genome sequencing (rWGS) or rapid whole-exome sequencing (rWES) in infants with diseases of unknown etiology in intensive care units (ICUs). Gravely ill infants were not randomized and received ultra-rapid whole-genome sequencing (urWGS). Herein we report results of clinician surveys of the clinical utility of rapid genomic sequencing (RGS). The primary end-point-clinician perception that RGS was useful- was met for 154 (77%) of 201 infants. Both positive and negative tests were rated as having clinical utility (42 of 45 [93%] and 112 of 156 [72%], respectively). Physicians reported that RGS changed clinical management in 57 (28%) infants, particularly in those receiving urWGS (p = 0.0001) and positive tests (p < 0.00001). Outcomes of 32 (15%) infants were perceived to be changed by RGS. Positive tests changed outcomes more frequently than negative tests (p < 0.00001). In logistic regression models, the likelihood that RGS was perceived as useful increased 6.7-fold when associated with changes in management (95% CI 1.8-43.3). Changes in management were 10.1-fold more likely when results were positive (95% CI 4.7-22.4) and turnaround time was shorter (odds ratio 0.92, 95% CI 0.85-0.99). RGS seldom led to clinician-perceived confusion or distress among families (6 of 207 [3%]). In summary, clinicians perceived high clinical utility and low likelihood of harm with first-tier RGS of infants in ICUs with diseases of unknown etiology. RGS was perceived as beneficial irrespective of whether results were positive or negative. PMID:33157007 | PMC:PMC7675004 | DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.10.003

November 6, 2020
RPM for NICU and PICU

2018

Acute liver failure in neonates with undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance due to exposure from widely available infant formulas

Li H, Byers HM, Diaz-Kuan A, Vos MB, Hall PL, Tortorelli S, Singh R, Wallenstein MB, Allain M, Dimmock DP, Farrell RM, McCandless S, Gambello MJ.

Mol Genet Metab. 2018 Apr;123(4):428-432. doi: 10.1016/j.ymgme.2018.02.016. Epub 2018 Feb 27. ABSTRACT Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by aldolase B (ALDOB) deficiency resulting in an inability to metabolize fructose. The toxic accumulation of intermediate fructose-1-phosphate causes multiple metabolic disturbances, including postprandial hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, electrolyte disturbance, and liver/kidney dysfunction. The clinical presentation varies depending on the age of exposure and the load of fructose. Some common infant formulas contain fructose in various forms, such as sucrose, a disaccharide of fructose and glucose. Exposure to formula containing fructogenic compounds is an important, but often overlooked trigger for severe metabolic disturbances in HFI. Here we report four neonates with undiagnosed HFI, all caused by the common, homozygous mutation c.448G>C (p.A150P) in ALDOB, who developed life-threatening acute liver failure due to fructose-containing formulas. These cases underscore the importance of dietary history and consideration of HFI in cases of neonatal or infantile acute liver failure for prompt diagnosis and treatment of HFI. PMID:29510902 | DOI:10.1016/j.ymgme.2018.02.016

March 8, 2018
RPM for NICU and PICU

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