Scientific Publications

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14 Results

2021

Artificial intelligence enables comprehensive genome interpretation and nomination of candidate diagnoses for rare genetic diseases

De La Vega FM, Chowdhury S, Moore B, Frise E, McCarthy J, Hernandez EJ, Wong T, James K, Guidugli L, Agrawal PB, Genetti CA, Brownstein CA, Beggs AH, Löscher BS, Franke A, Boone B, Levy SE, Õunap K, Pajusalu S, Huentelman M, Ramsey K, Naymik M, Narayanan V, Veeraraghavan N, Billings P, Reese MG, Yandell M, Kingsmore SF.

Genome Med. 2021 Oct 14;13(1):153. doi: 10.1186/s13073-021-00965-0. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Clinical interpretation of genetic variants in the context of the patient’s phenotype is becoming the largest component of cost and time expenditure for genome-based diagnosis of rare genetic diseases. Artificial intelligence (AI) holds promise to greatly simplify and speed genome interpretation by integrating predictive methods with the growing knowledge of genetic disease. Here we assess the diagnostic performance of Fabric GEM, a new, AI-based, clinical decision support tool for expediting genome interpretation. METHODS: We benchmarked GEM in a retrospective cohort of 119 probands, mostly NICU infants, diagnosed with rare genetic diseases, who received whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing (WGS, WES). We replicated our analyses in a separate cohort of 60 cases collected from five academic medical centers. For comparison, we also analyzed these cases with current state-of-the-art variant prioritization tools. Included in the comparisons were trio, duo, and singleton cases. Variants underpinning diagnoses spanned diverse modes of inheritance and types, including structural variants (SVs). Patient phenotypes were extracted from clinical notes by two means: manually and using an automated clinical natural language processing (CNLP) tool. Finally, 14 previously unsolved cases were reanalyzed. RESULTS: GEM ranked over 90% of the causal genes among the top or second candidate and prioritized for review a median of 3 candidate genes per case, using either manually curated or CNLP-derived phenotype descriptions. Ranking of trios and duos was unchanged when analyzed as singletons. In 17 of 20 cases with diagnostic SVs, GEM identified the causal SVs as the top candidate and in 19/20 within the top five, irrespective of whether SV calls were provided or inferred ab initio by GEM using its own internal SV detection algorithm. GEM showed similar performance in absence of parental genotypes. Analysis of 14 previously unsolved cases resulted in a novel finding for one case, candidates ultimately not advanced upon manual review for 3 cases, and no new findings for 10 cases. CONCLUSIONS: GEM enabled diagnostic interpretation inclusive of all variant types through automated nomination of a very short list of candidate genes and disorders for final review and reporting. In combination with deep phenotyping by CNLP, GEM enables substantial automation of genetic disease diagnosis, potentially decreasing cost and expediting case review. PMID:34645491 | DOI:10.1186/s13073-021-00965-0

October 14, 2021
Rare Disease

Insights into the expanding phenotypic spectrum of inherited disorders of biogenic amines

Kuseyri Hübschmann O, Horvath G, Cortès-Saladelafont E, Yıldız Y, Mastrangelo M, Pons R, Friedman J, Mercimek-Andrews S, Wong SN, Pearson TS, Zafeiriou DI, Kulhánek J, Kurian MA, López-Laso E, Oppebøen M, Kılavuz S, Wassenberg T, Goez H, Scholl-Bürgi S, Porta F, Honzík T, Santer R, Burlina A, Sivri HS, Leuzzi V, Hoffmann GF, Jeltsch K, Hübschmann D, Garbade SF; iNTD Registry Study Group, García-Cazorla A, Opladen T.

Nat Commun. 2021 Sep 20;12(1):5529. doi: 10.1038/s41467-021-25515-5. ABSTRACT Inherited disorders of neurotransmitter metabolism are rare neurodevelopmental diseases presenting with movement disorders and global developmental delay. This study presents the results of the first standardized deep phenotyping approach and describes the clinical and biochemical presentation at disease onset as well as diagnostic approaches of 275 patients from the registry of the International Working Group on Neurotransmitter related Disorders. The results reveal an increased rate of prematurity, a high risk for being small for gestational age and for congenital microcephaly in some disorders. Age at diagnosis and the diagnostic delay are influenced by the diagnostic methods applied and by disease-specific symptoms. The timepoint of investigation was also a significant factor: delay to diagnosis has decreased in recent years, possibly due to novel diagnostic approaches or raised awareness. Although each disorder has a specific biochemical pattern, we observed confounding exceptions to the rule. The data provide comprehensive insights into the phenotypic spectrum of neurotransmitter disorders. PMID:34545092 | DOI:10.1038/s41467-021-25515-5

September 23, 2021
NeurogenomicsRare Disease

Commentary: Galactosemia Diagnosis by Whole Exome Sequencing Later in Life

Friedman J, Lucas-Del-Pozo S, Moreno-Martinez D, Camprodon-Gomez M, Moreno-Martinez D, Hernandez-Vara J, Kurian MA.

Mov Disord Clin Pract. 2021 Sep 3;8(Suppl 1):S40-S41. doi: 10.1002/mdc3.13304. eCollection 2021 Aug. NO ABSTRACT PMID:34514047 | PMC:PMC8414503 | DOI:10.1002/mdc3.13304

September 16, 2021
Rare Disease

Maternal Smoking and Congenital Heart Defects, National Birth Defects Prevention Study, 1997-2011

Bolin EH, Gokun Y, Romitti PA, Tinker SC, Summers AD, Roberson PK, Hobbs CA, Malik S, Botto LD, Nembhard WN

J Pediatr. 2021 Sep 8:S0022-3476(21)00877-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.09.005. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: To assess associations between maternal smoking and congenital heart defects (CHDs) in offspring. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a retrospective case-control study using data for cases of CHD (n=8,339) and non-malformed controls (n=11,020) children from all years (1997-2011) of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Maternal self-reported smoking one month before through three months after conception was evaluated as a binary (none, any) and categorical (light, medium, heavy) exposure. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals. Stratified analyses were performed for septal defects according to maternal age, pre-pregnancy body mass index, and maternal race/ethnicity. RESULTS: Multiple CHDs displayed modest associations with any level of maternal periconceptional smoking independent of potential confounders; the strongest associations were for aggregated septal defects (OR 1.5 [1.3-1.7]), tricuspid atresia (OR 1.7 [1.0-2.7]), and double outlet right ventricle (DORV) (1.5 [1.1-2.1]). TA and DORV also displayed dose-response relationships. Among heavy smokers, the highest odds were again observed for TA (aOR 3.0 [1.5-6.1]) and DORV (aOR 1.5 [1.1-2.2]). Heavy smokers ≥35 years old more frequently had a child with a septal defect when compared with similarly aged non-smokers (aOR 2.3 [1.4-3.9]). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal periconceptional smoking is most strongly associated with septal defects, TA and DORV; the risk for septal defects is modified by maternal age. PMID:34508749 | DOI:10.1016/j.jpeds.2021.09.005

September 16, 2021
Rare Disease

To Be or No B2: A Rare Cause of Stridor and Weakness in a Toddler

Aliya L. Frederick, MD, PhD, Jennifer H. Yang, MD, Sarah Schneider, MD, Alexis Quade, MD, Lucia Guidugli, PhD, CGMBS, Kristen Wigby, MD, Melissa Cameron, MD

Child Neurol Open. 2021 Aug 5;8:2329048X211030723. doi: 10.1177/2329048X211030723. eCollection 2021 Jan-Dec. ABSTRACT We present a case of a young child with a rare metabolic disorder whose clinical presentation resembled that of autoimmune myasthenia gravis. The differential diagnosis was expanded when autoantibody testing was negative and the patient did not respond to standard immunomodulatory therapies. Rapid whole genome sequencing identified 2 rare variants of uncertain significance in the SLC52A3 gene shown to be in compound heterozygous state after parental testing. Biallelic mutations in SLC52A3 are associated with Riboflavin Transporter Deficiency, which in its untreated form, results in progressive neurodegeneration and death. Supplementation with oral riboflavin has been shown to limit disease progression and improve symptoms in some patients. When the diagnosis is suspected, patients should be started on supplementation immediately while awaiting results from genetic studies. PMID:34395718 | PMC:PMC8361551 | DOI:10.1177/2329048X211030723

August 17, 2021
Rare Disease

Exome sequencing of child-parent trios with bladder exstrophy: Findings in 26 children

Pitsava G, Feldkamp ML, Pankratz N, Lane J, Kay DM, Conway KM, Shaw GM, Reefhuis J, Jenkins MM, Almli LM, Olshan AF, Pangilinan F, Brody LC, Sicko RJ, Hobbs CA, Bamshad M, McGoldrick D, Nickerson DA, Finnell RH, Mullikin J, Romitti PA, Mills JL

Am J Med Genet A. 2021 Aug 5. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.62439. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT Bladder exstrophy (BE) is a rare, lower ventral midline defect with the bladder and part of the urethra exposed. The etiology of BE is unknown but thought to be influenced by genetic variation with more recent studies suggesting a role for rare variants. As such, we conducted paired-end exome sequencing in 26 child/mother/father trios. Three children had rare (allele frequency ≤ 0.0001 in several public databases) inherited variants in TSPAN4, one with a loss-of-function variant and two with missense variants. Two children had loss-of-function variants in TUBE1. Four children had rare missense or nonsense variants (one per child) in WNT3, CRKL, MYH9, or LZTR1, genes previously associated with BE. We detected 17 de novo missense variants in 13 children and three de novo loss-of-function variants (AKR1C2, PRRX1, PPM1D) in three children (one per child). We also detected rare compound heterozygous loss-of-function variants in PLCH2 and CLEC4M and rare inherited missense or loss-of-function variants in additional genes applying autosomal recessive (three genes) and X-linked recessive inheritance models (13 genes). Variants in two genes identified may implicate disruption in cell migration (TUBE1) and adhesion (TSPAN4) processes, mechanisms proposed for BE, and provide additional evidence for rare variants in the development of this defect. PMID:34355505 | DOI:10.1002/ajmg.a.62439

August 9, 2021
Gene DiscoveryRare Disease

Use of Metagenomic Next-Generation Sequencing to Identify Pathogens in Pediatric Osteoarticular Infections

Ramchandar N, Burns J, Coufal NG, Pennock A, Briggs B, Stinnett R, Bradley J, Arnold J, Liu GY, Pring M, Upasani VV, Rickert K, Dimmock D, Chiu C, Farnaes L, Cannavino C.

Open Forum Infect Dis. 2021 Jul 17;8(7):ofab346. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofab346. eCollection 2021 Jul. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Osteoarticular infections (OAIs) are frequently encountered in children. Treatment may be guided by isolation of a pathogen; however, operative cultures are often negative. Metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) allows for broad and sensitive pathogen detection that is culture-independent. We sought to evaluate the diagnostic utility of mNGS in comparison to culture and usual care testing to detect pathogens in acute osteomyelitis and/or septic arthritis in children. METHODS: This was a single-site study to evaluate the use of mNGS in comparison to culture to detect pathogens in acute pediatric osteomyelitis and/or septic arthritis. Subjects admitted to a tertiary children’s hospital with suspected OAI were eligible for enrollment. We excluded subjects with bone or joint surgery within 30 days of admission or with chronic osteomyelitis. Operative samples were obtained at the surgeon’s discretion per standard care (fluid or tissue) and based on imaging and operative findings. We compared mNGS to culture and usual care testing (culture and polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) from the same site. RESULTS: We recruited 42 subjects over the enrollment period. mNGS of the operative samples identified a pathogen in 26 subjects compared to 19 subjects in whom culture identified a pathogen. In 4 subjects, mNGS identified a pathogen where combined usual care testing (culture and PCR) was negative. Positive predictive agreement and negative predictive agreement both were 93.0% for mNGS. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-site prospective study of pediatric OAI, we demonstrated the diagnostic utility of mNGS testing in comparison to culture and usual care (culture and PCR) from operative specimens. PMID:34322569 | PMC:PMC8314938 | DOI:10.1093/ofid/ofab346

July 30, 2021
Rare Disease

Ending a diagnostic odyssey: Moving from exome to genome to identify cockayne syndrome

Friedman J, Bird LM, Haas R, Robbins SL, Nahas SA, Dimmock DP, Yousefzadeh MJ, Witt MA, Niedernhofer LJ, Chowdhury S. 

Mol Genet Genomic Med. 2021 Jun 2:e1623. doi: 10.1002/mgg3.1623. Online ahead of print. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth failure and multisystemic degeneration. Excision repair cross-complementation group 6 (ERCC6 OMIM: *609413) is the gene most frequently mutated in CS. METHODS: A child with pre and postnatal growth failure and progressive neurologic deterioration with multisystem involvement, and with nondiagnostic whole-exome sequencing, was screened for causal variants with whole-genome sequencing (WGS). RESULTS: WGS identified biallelic ERCC6 variants, including a previously unreported intronic variant. Pathogenicity of these variants was established by demonstrating reduced levels of ERCC6 mRNA and protein expression, normal unscheduled DNA synthesis, and impaired recovery of RNA synthesis in patient fibroblasts following UV-irradiation. CONCLUSION: The study confirms the pathogenicity of a previously undescribed upstream intronic variant, highlighting the power of genome sequencing to identify noncoding variants. In addition, this report provides evidence for the utility of a combination approach of genome sequencing plus functional studies to provide diagnosis in a child for whom a lengthy diagnostic odyssey, including exome sequencing, was previously unrevealing. PMID:34076366 | DOI:10.1002/mgg3.1623

June 2, 2021
Genetic Neurologic DiseaseRare Disease

2020

Failure to thrive – an overlooked manifestation of KMT2B-related dystonia: a case presentation

Ng A, Galosi S, Salz L, Wong T, Schwager C, Amudhavalli S, Gelineau-Morel R, Chowdhury S; Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine Investigators, Friedman J.

BMC Neurol. 2020 Jun 16;20(1):246. doi: 10.1186/s12883-020-01798-x. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: KMT2B-related dystonia is a recently described form of childhood onset dystonia that may improve with deep brain stimulation. Prior reports have focused on neurologic features including prominent bulbar involvement without detailing general health consequences that may result from orolingual dysfunction. We describe a family with novel KMT2B mutation with several members with failure to thrive to highlight this non-neurologic, but consequential impact of mutation in this gene. CASE PRESENTATION: We present a case of a 15-year old female who was admitted and evaluated for failure to thrive. On exam, she had severe speech dysfluency, limited ability to protrude the tongue, and generalized dystonia involving the oromandibular region, right upper and left lower extremity with left foot inversion contracture. The proband and her parents underwent whole genome sequencing. A previously undescribed variant, c.4960 T > C (p.Cys1654Arg), was identified in the KMT2B gene in the proband and mother, and this variant was subsequently confirmed in two maternal cousins, one with failure to thrive. Literature review identified frequent reports of prominent bulbar involvement but failure to thrive is rarely mentioned. CONCLUSION: Failure to thrive is a common pediatric clinical condition that has consequences for growth and development. In the presence of an abnormal neurologic exam, a search for a specific underlying genetic etiology should be pursued. With this case series, we highlight an unusual potentially treatable cause of failure to thrive, reinforce the importance of precise molecular diagnosis for patients with failure to thrive and an abnormal neurologic exam, and underscore the importance of cascade screening of family members. PMID:32546208 | PMC:PMC7296679 | DOI:10.1186/s12883-020-01798-x

June 18, 2020
Genetic Neurologic DiseaseNeurogenomicsRare Disease

The Medical Genome Initiative: moving whole-genome sequencing for rare disease diagnosis to the clinic

Marshall CR, Bick D, Belmont JW, Taylor SL, Ashley E, Dimmock D, Jobanputra V, Kearney HM, Kulkarni S, Rehm H; Medical Genome Initiative.

Genome Med. 2020 May 27;12(1):48. doi: 10.1186/s13073-020-00748-z. ABSTRACT Clinical whole-genome sequencing (WGS) offers clear diagnostic benefits for patients with rare disease. However, there are barriers to its widespread adoption, including a lack of standards for clinical practice. The Medical Genome Initiative consortium was formed to provide practical guidance and support the development of standards for the use of clinical WGS. PMID:32460895 | PMC:PMC7254704 | DOI:10.1186/s13073-020-00748-z

May 29, 2020
Rare Disease

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