Rapid Precision Medicine

Our research and clinical work is focused on accelerating and optimizing the whole genome sequencing process to offer testing, analysis and interpretation of life-threatening genetic variations for newborns and children enrolled in one of our multi-center clinical studies.

Our primary focus has been on babies and children hospitalized in neonatal, pediatric or cardiovascular intensive care. In other cases, our studies focus on ending the diagnostic odyssey for stable pediatric patients who have been living with a rare disease, the cause of which has not been identified.

Change in Clinical Management to Improve Outcomes

Providing a rapid diagnosis is particularly important in cases where early intervention with a highly specific treatment, can prevent severe disability or death. Historically, testing for genetic disorders has been a lengthy, difficult process that rarely provided actionable data in time to change the patient’s medical management. Both positive (molecular diagnosis) and negative findings from rapid Whole Genome Sequencing™ (rWGS®) can inform optimal treatment of patients and also facilitate accurate, evidence-based discussions with the families of critically ill children in intensive care unit (ICU) settings.

Building the Evidence Base for rWGS

RCIGM research has contributed to 9 of 20 clinical trials demonstrating the utility of genome wide sequencing in children in intensive care settings.

The published evidence supporting the clinical utility of rapid Whole Genome Sequencing™ (rWGS®) and rapid whole exome sequencing (rWES) has increased rapidly.

PubMed IDSequence TypeNeonatal & Pediatric ICU Enrollment CriteriaPatientsDiagnosis RateClinical UtilityChange in Outcome
Indicates RCIGM publicationrWGS = rapid WGS | urWGS = ultra-rapid Whole Genome Sequencing | rWES = rapid Whole Exome Sequencing
23035047urWGS NICU infants with suspected genetic disease475%n.d.n.d.
25937001rWGS<4 mo of age; suspected actionable genetic disease3557%31%29%
28973083rWES<100 days of life; Suspected genetic disease6351%37%19%
29449963rWGS<4 mo of age; Suspected genetic disease3241%31%n.d.
29644095rWGSinfants; Suspected genetic disease4243%31%26%
29543227rWESAcutely ill children with suspected genetic diseases4053%30%8%
30049826rWGSChildren; PICU and Cardiovascular ICU2442%13%n.d.
31246743rWGS4 months-18 years; PICU; Suspected genetic diseases3848%39%8%
30847515rWGSSuspected genetic disease19521%13%n.d.
31019026urWGS Infants; Suspected genetic disease743%43%n.d.
31780822rWES<4 mo of age; ICU; hypotonia, seizures, metabolic, multiple congenital anomalies5054%48%n.d.
32411386rWESNICU & PICU; complex13048%23%n.d.
32553838rWES<6 months; ICU; suspected genetic disease4652%52%n.d.
32221475rWESPICU; < 6 years; new metabolic/neurologic disease1050%30%n.d.
32336750rWESInfants; ICU; Genetic consult36827%22%n.d.
32573669urWES NICU and PICU; Genetic counsult10851%44%n.d.
32668698rWESICU infants; Severe or progressive conditions1872%n.d.n.d.
31564432rWGSInfants; disease of unknown etiology; within 96 hours of admission9419%24%10%
rWES9520%20%18%
urWGS2446%63%25%
Baby BearurWGSMediCal Infants; <1 week of admission17843%31%n.d.
Baby ManateeurWGSInpatient children; 90% in ICUs5040%38%n.d.

Timely Dissemination

When we return genetic test results, we make experts available to assist the doctors caring for a child to find the most up to date information on the disorder.

RCIGM Related Publications

An automated 13.5 hour system for scalable diagnosis and acute management guidance for genetic diseases
Mallory J. Owen, Sebastien Lefebvre, Christian Hansen, Chris M. Kunard, David P. Dimmock, Laurie D. Smith, Gunter Scharer, Rebecca Mardach, Mary J. Willis, Annette Feigenbaum, Anna-Kaisa Niemi, Yan Ding, Luca Van Der Kraan, Katarzyna Ellsworth, Lucia Guidugli, Bryan R. Lajoie, Timothy K. McPhail, Shyamal S. Mehtalia, Kevin K. Chau, Yong H. Kwon, Zhanyang Zhu, Sergey Batalov, Shimul Chowdhury, Seema Rego, James Perry, Mark Speziale, Mark Nespeca, Meredith S. Wright, Martin G. Reese, Francisco M. De La Vega, Joe Azure, Erwin Frise, Charlene Son Rigby, Sandy White, Charlotte A. Hobbs, Sheldon Gilmer, Gail Knight, Albert Oriol, Jerica Lenberg, Shareef A. Nahas, Kate Perofsky, Kyu Kim, Jeanne Carroll, Nicole G. Coufal, Erica Sanford, Kristen Wigby, Jacqueline Weir, Vicki S. Thomson, Louise Fraser, Seka S. Lazare, Yoon H. Shin, Haiying Grunenwald, Richard Lee, David Jones, Duke Tran, Andrew Gross, Patrick Daigle, Anne Case, Marisa Lue, James A. Richardson, John Reynders, Thomas Defay, Kevin P. Hall, Narayanan Veeraraghavan & Stephen F. Kingsmore

Nat Commun. 2022 Jul 26;13(1):4057. doi: 10.1038/s41467-022-31446-6.

While many genetic diseases have effective treatments, they frequently progress rapidly to severe morbidity or mortality if those treatments are not implemented immediately. Since front-line physicians frequently lack familiarity with these diseases, timely molecular diagnosis may not improve outcomes. Herein we describe Genome-to-Treatment, an automated, virtual system for genetic disease diagnosis and acute management guidance. Diagnosis is achieved in 13.5 h by expedited whole genome sequencing, with superior analytic performance for structural and copy number variants. An expert panel adjudicated the indications, contraindications, efficacy, and evidence-of-efficacy of 9911 drug, device, dietary, and surgical interventions for 563 severe, childhood, genetic diseases. The 421 (75%) diseases and 1527 (15%) effective interventions retained are integrated with 13 genetic disease information resources and appended to diagnostic reports (https://gtrx.radygenomiclab.com). This system provided correct diagnoses in four retrospectively and two prospectively tested infants. The Genome-to-Treatment system facilitates optimal outcomes in children with rapidly progressive genetic diseases.

PMID:35882841 | DOI:10.1038/s41467-022-31446-6

Ultra Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing: A Paradigm Shift in the Pre-Transplant Evaluation of Neonatal Acute Liver Failure
Thompson WS, Greenmyer JR, Lanpher BC, Brumbaugh JE, Bendel-Stenzel EM, Dimmock DP, Hobbs CA, Ibrahim SH, Hildreth AN.

Liver Transpl. 2022 Jul 21. doi: 10.1002/lt.26547. Online ahead of print.

NO ABSTRACT

PMID:35861277 | DOI:10.1002/lt.26547

Better and Faster is Cheaper
Sanford Kobayashi EF, Dimmock DP. 

Hum Mutat. 2022 Jun 20. doi: 10.1002/humu.24422. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

The rapid pace of advancement in genomic sequencing technology has recently reached a new milestone, with a record-setting time to molecular diagnosis of a mere eight hours. The catalyst behind this achievement is the accumulation of evidence indicating that quicker results more often make an impact on patient care and lead to healthcare cost savings. Herein, we review the diagnostic and clinical utility of rapid whole genome and rapid whole exome sequencing, the associated reduction in healthcare costs, and the relationship between these outcome measures and time-to-diagnosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID:35723630 | DOI:10.1002/humu.24422

The Role of Genome Sequencing in Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Kingsmore SF, Cole FS.

Annu Rev Genomics Hum Genet. 2022 Jun 8. doi: 10.1146/annurev-genom-120921-103442. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Genetic diseases disrupt the functionality of an infant’s genome during fetal-neonatal adaptation and represent a leading cause of neonatal and infant mortality in the United States. Due to disease acuity, gene locus and allelic heterogeneity, and overlapping and diverse clinical phenotypes, diagnostic genome sequencing in neonatal intensive care units has required the development of methods to shorten turnaround times and improve genomic interpretation. From 2012 to 2021, 31 clinical studies documented the diagnostic and clinical utility of first-tier rapid or ultrarapid whole-genome sequencing through cost-effective identification of pathogenic genomic variants that change medical management, suggest new therapeutic strategies, and refine prognoses. Genomic diagnosis also permits prediction of reproductive recurrence risk for parents and surviving probands. Using implementation science and quality improvement, deployment of a genomic learning healthcare system will contribute to a reduction of neonatal and infant mortality through the integration of genome sequencing into best-practice neonatal intensive care. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics, Volume 23 is October 2022. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

PMID:35676073 | DOI:10.1146/annurev-genom-120921-103442

Best practices for the interpretation and reporting of clinical whole genome sequencing
Austin-Tse CA, Jobanputra V, Perry DL, Bick D, Taft RJ, Venner E, Gibbs RA, Young T, Barnett S, Belmont JW, Boczek N, Chowdhury S, Ellsworth KA, Guha S, Kulkarni S, Marcou C, Meng L, Murdock DR, Rehman AU, Spiteri E, Thomas-Wilson A, Kearney HM, Rehm HL; Medical Genome Initiative*.

NPJ Genom Med. 2022 Apr 8;7(1):27. doi: 10.1038/s41525-022-00295-z.

ABSTRACT

Whole genome sequencing (WGS) shows promise as a first-tier diagnostic test for patients with rare genetic disorders. However, standards addressing the definition and deployment practice of a best-in-class test are lacking. To address these gaps, the Medical Genome Initiative, a consortium of leading health care and research organizations in the US and Canada, was formed to expand access to high quality clinical WGS by convening experts and publishing best practices. Here, we present best practice recommendations for the interpretation and reporting of clinical diagnostic WGS, including discussion of challenges and emerging approaches that will be critical to harness the full potential of this comprehensive test.

PMID:35395838 | DOI:10.1038/s41525-022-00295-z

Healthcare Professionals’ Attitudes toward Rapid Whole Genome Sequencing in Pediatric Acute Care
Franck LS, Scheurer-Monaghan A, Bupp CP, Fakhoury JD, Hoffmann TJ, Deshpandey M, Arenchild M, Dimmock DP.

Children. 2022; 9(3):357.

Abstract

We aimed to characterize knowledge and attitudes about rapid whole genome sequencing (rWGS) implementation of a broad constituency of healthcare professionals at hospitals participating in a statewide initiative to implement rWGS for hospitalized neonates and children up to 18 years of age meeting clinical criteria for testing. We surveyed 307 healthcare professionals from eight hospitals about their knowledge and attitudes regarding rWGS. We examined survey internal reliability using exploratory factor analysis and associations between respondent characteristics and attitudes toward rWGS with linear regression. We thematically analyzed free-text responses. Views about rWGS implementation in respondents’ own setting and respondents’ personal capability to implement rWGS were generally neutral (M = 3.44 (SD = 0.74); M = 3.30 (SD = 0.85), respectively). Views about the potential for rWGS in clinical practice were overall positive (M = 4.12 (SD = 0.57)). The degree of positivity of attitudes about rWGS was strongly influenced by perceived knowledge, clinical or non-clinical role, concerns about future insurance coverage for rWGS as a first-tier test, and future adverse impact of genomics health information on patients or families. We identified several actionable factors influencing attitudes toward rWGS of pediatric healthcare professionals. Expanded education and ongoing implementation research are needed for the full potential of rWGS in pediatrics to be realized.
https://doi.org/10.3390/children9030357

Rapid Precision Medicine In the News

Want to Learn More?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed hendrerit sed arcu a tincidunt. Phasellus pharetra nisi sed risus pulvinar, vulputate molestie nulla vestibulum. Vestibulum vel ex blandit, ultricies libero sit amet, pellentesque odio. Fusce lobortis pharetra nisl non

Key Facts

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consect adipiscing elit. 
  • Sed tristique ligula accumsan, elum nunc et, viverra neque.
  • Cras pellentesque velit at nisi gravida, ac blandit libero pulvi.

Section Seperator

In Line Title

Left Image Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas posuere turpis risus, vel ornare diam ullamcorper eu. Morbi hendrerit id ligula pretium egestas. Maecenas posuere turpis risus, vel ornare.

In Line Title

Left Image Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Maecenas posuere turpis risus, vel ornare diam ullamcorper eu. Morbi hendrerit id ligula pretium egestas. Maecenas posuere turpis risus, vel ornare.

Robert Wechler-Reva

PHD, Neuro-Oncology Program Director

Noted scientist Robert Wechsler-Reya, PhD, is also a professor and researcher at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) where he is focused on investigating the genes and nervous system signaling pathways that contribute to medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children.

Contact Us About BeginNGS